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Consideration

‘consideration’  ‘Having information at our fingertips is convenient, but serious consideration needs to be given to the way in which this is affecting academic achievement.’ Uncountable Noun, Formal Meaning: careful thought and attention TOP...

Benefit

‘benefit’  ‘Although this development has brought real benefits, some are concerned about its impact on learning.’. Meaning 1: advantage TOP TIP: Whenever you talk about the benefits or drawbacks (advantages/disadvantages), try to add an...

Advent

‘advent’  ‘With the advent of the Internet, information is immediately available through computers and other smart devices’. ‘the advent of something’ = the time when something first began to be widely used e.g. the internet,...

Waste, rubbish, trash, litter, garbage

Friday Takeaways Get all the Friday Takeaway Tips here ‘waste’ is uncountable ‘WASTE’ and all its ‘near-synonyms’ (rubbish, trash, litter, garbage, refuse) is UNCOUNTABLE, so it takes a SINGULAR verb e.g. ‘Plastic waste ends...

Trouble vs Problem

Friday Takeaways ‘trouble’ vs ‘problem’ [Adapted from an archived British Council page so I’m saving it here before it disappears!} Problem is a countable noun and describes something that causes trouble or difficulty. You can have a...

People are easy to learn

Friday Takeaways ‘It is easy for people to…’ English uses ‘it’ in sentences where it has no meaning. This is known as the dummy or empty or introductory ‘it’. Some well-known expressions are: – It’s raining....

On the contrary vs In contrast

Friday Takeaways ‘On the contrary…’ …does not mean the same as ‘In contrast’! ‘On the contrary’ is used to: ADD to a negative statement disagree with a negative statement made by someone else answer NO to a question e.g....

Moreover

Friday Takeaways ‘Moreover’ The danger of ‘Moreover’ Sometimes we rush to write ‘Moreover’ (the next point), when we haven’t finished explaining our first point. There’s an easy solution – just avoid...

Accommodation

Friday Takeaways ‘Accommodation’ Accommodation: Countable or uncountable? Check out the rules and examples here from the Longman Online Dictionary: 1 [uncountable] especially British English (also accommodations American English) e.g. Can you...

According to

Friday Takeaways ‘According to…’ Look at the correct examples of how to use ‘according to’. What do you notice? ‘According to the weather forecast, it’s going to rain tomorrow’. ‘According to our records, you still...